25th Anniversary of The Coquille Restoration Act to be Celebrated at the Mill

Coquille Tribe, Events Add comments

June 28, 1989 marks a great turning point in Coquille Indian Tribe history.  This was the day the President signed the Coquille Restoration Act into law and restored the Tribe’s government-to-government relationship with the United States that was “terminated” 35 years earlier.  This year the Coquille Tribe celebrates the 25-year anniversary of this occasion and you are invited to join in the celebration at a very special event. Join us June 28-29, 2014 at the Mill Casino Hotel & RV Park to celebrate the history and culture of the Coquille Indian Tribe.

The Coquille Restoration Act is one of the most significant events in Tribal history because it enabled the Coquille Tribe to form a government that could create programs to provide housing, health care, education, elder care, law enforcement and judicial services to its members. Most importantly, it provided the Tribe with the tools necessary to pursue economic self-sufficiency.

With its government and business operations, the Coquille Indian Tribe is now the second largest employer in Coos County, Oregon. Along with The Mill Casino, the Tribe maintains successful business ventures in forestry, arts and exhibits, high-speed telecommunications and renewable energy.

Here are some of the special events scheduled so far for this unique celebration:

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Pow Wow: 1st Grand Entry 1:00 p.m.
Native Craft Vendors
Salmon Bake Meal $15.00 per guest

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Pow Wow: Grand Entry 12:00 p.m.
Native Craft Vendors
Ala Cart Meal Service Available

A Brief History of the Coquille Indian Tribe
The Coquille People lived and prospered along the rivers and estuaries of Oregon’s South Coast for centuries. Euro-Americans began arriving in the late 1700s bringing diseases such as smallpox, measles and plague that decimated entire villages. Then, in the 1850s, a new form of “fever” — the discovery of gold — brought an influx of settlers whose mining bespoiled the rivers and whose hostility toward the Native inhabitants of the area became increasingly violent.

A treaty was negotiated in 1855, but it was overlooked and never ratified by Congress. The Coquille People were removed to the Coast Reservation, where overcrowding and disease took their toll. The few that were able to return to their homeland kept the Coquille Tribe alive until 1954 when, through the Indian termination acts, the federal government ended its recognition 109 tribes. Coquille Tribal members worked hard to right this wrong and by 1989, federal recognition and Tribal sovereignty was successfully restored.

Learn more by visiting www.coquilletribe.org.

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