September Event Round Up at The Mill!

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Oregon Coast Casino

Staying at The Mill is September? Have we got an exciting month in store for you! Here is a sampling of things to do as you take a break from the fun of slots, table games, and waterfront dining.  Travel safe, and we’ll see you soon!

Comedy Night every Wednesday in Warehouse 101

They say laughter is the best medicine, and we happen to agree! Come LOL every Wednesday at Warehouse 101 (2 shows: 7 & 9pm) with some of the funniest comics on the West Coast! Great food, fun and entertainment for a relaxing time! Click here for this month’s schedule.

Live Music every Friday & Saturday Night in Warehouse 101

Friday & Saturday night, Warehouse 101 is live! That’s right, get your groove on and dance the night away to live music each night or stop in for a cool drink, great food and conversation. (2 Drink minimum during live entertainment.)  Click here for this month’s schedule.

Football Season!

We are just so PUMPED about football season, that we are opening #Warehouse101 at 9 AM on Saturday and Sundays all season long! With seven plasma-screen TVs, great food and drink, we are THE place to be during football season. Click here to see our other specials.

Mill Luck Salmon Celebration September 13th -14th

Join us for this FREE annual outdoor festival celebrating Native American and Coquille Tribal culture. Activities for the whole family include a salmon bake, canoe rides and races, Native drummers & dancers, and more! Click here for more info

Wheel Wednesdays, 2X Points Multiplier Days, $30,000 worth of Cash Drawings Every Sunday, Slot Tournament Thursdays, Tickets to Duck or Beaver Home Games and so much more!

It’s a fact- Mill Club Members have more fun! Not only do you get to participate in these exciting promotions, Mill Club members can earn free play, discounts, meals, merchandise and invitations to exclusive special events! Stop by the Mill Club Booth during the hours of Sun. – Thurs. 8 am – 11 pm; Fri. & Sat. 8 am – midnight to sign up FOR FREE! Click on the image to learn more about each promotion!

Coquille Tribal Community Fund invites non-profits to apply early for grant program

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It is never too early for area non-profit organizations to apply for grant funding through the Coquille Tribal Community Fund. Although the deadline for the current round of funding is Aug. 31, Fund officials say applying early gives organizations greater opportunity to guarantee that their applications are complete and competitive.

“When organizations submit their applications early, our Fund administrator has more time to review the applications and alert organizations to problems or missing information,” said Sheldon Chase, chairman of the Community Fund’s Board of Trustees. “We want every application to receive the full consideration that it deserves.”

The Fund provides grants to non-profit organizations and public agencies for specific projects in the areas of education, health, public safety, problem gaming, environmental issues, arts and culture and historic preservation. In last year’s funding cycle, the Tribe provided over $342,000 to 39 community and civic organizations.

Chase added that most applicants can begin their search online. Grant-seekers in the five-county area of Southwestern Oregon – Coos, Curry, Lane, Douglas and Jackson Counties – can go to www.coquilletribalfund.org to get full information on the grant program and begin the application process by using an online form for submitting a letter of inquiry. The site includes all of the criteria governing what organizations and projects qualify for grant funding and step-by-step guidance on how to apply.

Information also is available by calling the Tribal Community Fund at (541) 756-0904, or by sending an e-mail to info@coquilletribalfund.org .

The fund reflects the commitment of the Coquille Indian Tribe to take a proactive, positive role in the well-being of the community. Funds are managed and distributed by a board of trustees comprised of community leaders and representatives of the Coquille Indian Tribe.

Representatives from 39 community groups gathered with Community Fund board members and Tribal leaders at the 2013-2014 Coquille Tribal Community Fund awards luncheon earlier this year.

25th Anniversary of The Coquille Restoration Act to be Celebrated at the Mill

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June 28, 1989 marks a great turning point in Coquille Indian Tribe history.  This was the day the President signed the Coquille Restoration Act into law and restored the Tribe’s government-to-government relationship with the United States that was “terminated” 35 years earlier.  This year the Coquille Tribe celebrates the 25-year anniversary of this occasion and you are invited to join in the celebration at a very special event. Join us June 28-29, 2014 at the Mill Casino Hotel & RV Park to celebrate the history and culture of the Coquille Indian Tribe.

The Coquille Restoration Act is one of the most significant events in Tribal history because it enabled the Coquille Tribe to form a government that could create programs to provide housing, health care, education, elder care, law enforcement and judicial services to its members. Most importantly, it provided the Tribe with the tools necessary to pursue economic self-sufficiency.

With its government and business operations, the Coquille Indian Tribe is now the second largest employer in Coos County, Oregon. Along with The Mill Casino, the Tribe maintains successful business ventures in forestry, arts and exhibits, high-speed telecommunications and renewable energy.

Here are some of the special events scheduled so far for this unique celebration:

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Pow Wow: 1st Grand Entry 1:00 p.m.
Native Craft Vendors
Salmon Bake Meal $15.00 per guest

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Pow Wow: Grand Entry 12:00 p.m.
Native Craft Vendors
Ala Cart Meal Service Available

A Brief History of the Coquille Indian Tribe
The Coquille People lived and prospered along the rivers and estuaries of Oregon’s South Coast for centuries. Euro-Americans began arriving in the late 1700s bringing diseases such as smallpox, measles and plague that decimated entire villages. Then, in the 1850s, a new form of “fever” — the discovery of gold — brought an influx of settlers whose mining bespoiled the rivers and whose hostility toward the Native inhabitants of the area became increasingly violent.

A treaty was negotiated in 1855, but it was overlooked and never ratified by Congress. The Coquille People were removed to the Coast Reservation, where overcrowding and disease took their toll. The few that were able to return to their homeland kept the Coquille Tribe alive until 1954 when, through the Indian termination acts, the federal government ended its recognition 109 tribes. Coquille Tribal members worked hard to right this wrong and by 1989, federal recognition and Tribal sovereignty was successfully restored.

Learn more by visiting www.coquilletribe.org.

Coquille Tribal Community Fund awards $342,000 to support regional services

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2014 Coquille Tribal Community Fund Grant Recipients

The Coquille Tribal Community Fund awarded $342,000 in grants to 39 area non-profit organizations and public agencies this week during a special luncheon at The Mill Casino.

The following organizations received grants this year.

  • A Family for Every Child – $5,000 for adoption agency programs.
  • Bandon Community Youth Center – $3,300 for youth center operation costs.
  • Bandon Historical Society Museum – $3,000 to purchase display furniture.
  • Bay Area First Step – $3,500 for kitchen renovations.
  • Bay Area Senior Activity Center – $10,000 for food purchases.
  • CASA of Douglas County – $5,000 to train CASA volunteers.
  • Charleston Rural Fire Protection District – $5,500 to update traffic safety equipment.
  • Children’s Advocacy Center of Jackson County – $10.000 for therapy group services.
  • Christian Help Food Bank – $5,000 for delivery and transportation costs.
  • Coos Art Museum – $4,500 for the student biennial exhibit.
  • Coos Bay Seventh-Day Adventist Food Pantry – $10,000 for food purchases.
  • Coos County Public Health – $5,000 to purchase a new microscope for disease prevention.
  • Coos Historical & Maritime Center – $82,000 for building costs for the new center.
  • Ecumenical Emergency Food Cupboard – $10,000 for food purchases.
  • Egyptian Theatre – $10,000 for structural repairs.
  • F.I.R.S.T. – $2,000 to purchase books for students.
  • Florence Food Share – $5,000 for food purchases.
  • Habitat for Humanity/Rogue Valley – $5,000 for construction costs.
  • Kairos – $7,700 for treatment services for children and families.
  • Little Theater on the Bay – $8,000 for renovations and new seating.
  • Maslow Project of Coos County – $10,000 to provide necessities to those in need.
  • ORCCA-Share Bear Snack Pack program – $6,000 to feed hungry children on weekends and holidays.
  • ORCCA-CASA – $5,000 to train CASA volunteers.
  • ORCCA-South Coast Food Share – $8,000 for food costs.
  • Point Man Ministries Outpost 101 – $20,000 for the emergency fund for veterans and families.
  • Port Orford Street Revitalization Association – $3,500 for the downtown beautification project.
  • Pregnancy Resource Center – $2,000 to provide services to pregnant women.
  • Reedsport Volunteer Fire Department – $11,000 to purchase a new jaws of life.
  • Restoration Worship Center Food Pantry – $2,000 for food purchases.
  • Rogue Valley District Council – $10,000 for the emergency utility assistance program.
  • Siuslaw Outreach Services – $6,000 for the emergency voucher fund.
  • South Coast Alano Club – $10,000 for a new roof and heating system for the building.
  • South Coast Business Employment Corp. – $10,000 for senior nutrition program food costs.
  • Southern Oregon Lions Sight and Hearing – $5,000 to purchase low-cost hearing aids.
  • Southern Oregon Project Hope – $10,000 to provide the homeless community with basic necessities.
  • Star of Hope Activity Center – $8,500 to purchase a baler and box truck for cardboard recycling.
  • Sunset School – $2,000 to purchase electronics for the technology club.
  • Women’s Safety and Resource Center – $10,000 for direct client services.
  • Zonta – $3,500 to provide school supplies to low income children.

The Coquille Tribal Community Fund supports non-profit and governmental organizations with projects in the areas of education, health, public safety, problem gaming, environmental issues, arts and culture and historic preservation. Funds are managed and distributed by a board of trustees comprised of community leaders, a gubernatorial appointee and representatives of the Coquille Indian Tribe and the Coquille Economic Development Corporation.

The fund reflects the commitment of the Coquille Indian Tribe to take a proactive, positive role in the well-being of the community. The Tribe owns The Mill Casino • Hotel and is among the largest employers in Coos County.

“Ever since we created the Community Fund in 2001, this day has held an important place for members of Coquille Indian Tribe because it is an opportunity to share our bounty with our friends and neighbors,” said Coquille Tribal Council Chairperson Brenda Meade. “It is an honor to help those who are doing so much to improve lives in southwestern Oregon.”

Each year the Coquille Indian Tribe sets aside a portion of the gaming revenues from The Mill Casino to support projects by non-profit organizations in the Tribe’s five-county service area. Since its inception, the Fund has provided more than $4.6 million in grants for charitable efforts throughout the region.

Although this year’s funding continued to support regional cultural activities, including $82,000 to complete a $600,000 commitment to the Coos Historical and Maritime Center, the Fund’s Board of Trustees focused its giving to programs serving the most needy.

“Our economy continues to present serious challenges for so many people in southern Oregon,” said Sheldon Chase, Board of Trustees chairman. “This year we were able to provide $44,000 to programs serving children and $66,000 for food programs along with funding for a host of projects serving veterans, seniors and the disadvantaged among us.”

For organizations wishing to be considered for the next round of funding, the deadline for applications is Aug. 31. For more information, visit the Fund Web site at www.coquilletribalfund.org.

Coquille Tribal Community Fund Awards $207,000 to 2013 Grant Recipients at The Mill Casino

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“Every year at this time the members of the Coquille Indian Tribe take great pride in being able to give back to the many communities that we call home. The needs are great throughout our region, and we are pleased that our Community Fund can provide some much needed assistance.” -Coquille Tribal Council Chair Brenda Meade

The Coquille Tribal Community Fund awarded $207,000 in grants to the following 34 area non-profit organizations and public agencies this week:

  • Alternative Youth Activities – $2,000 to expand production aspects of the mushroom project.
  • Bandon Historical Society Museum – $2,000 for wall and floor displays.
  • Chetco Historical Memorial Committee – $5,000 for cement benches at the memorial.
  • Coos Bay Seventh-Day Adventist Food Pantry – $9,000 for food purchases.
  • Coos County Friends of Public Health – $5,000 for health service vouchers.
  • Coos County STEP – $10,000 for a hatchery alarm system.
  • Coos Historical & Maritime Museum – $35,000 for Maritime Museum and Plaza.
  • Crossroads Community Café – $5,000 for a pilot project involving nursing students.
  • Dolphin Players – $2,000 for theater infrastructure.
  • Ecumenical Emergency Food Cupboard – $6,000 for food purchases.
  • Egyptian Theatre Preservation Assoc. – $10,000 for structural improvements.
  • First United Methodist Church – $3,500 for Blossom Gulch Snack Pack program.
  • Helping Hand of Myrtle Point – $4,000 for emergency aid.
  • LEAF – $2,000 for the After School program.
  • Maslow Project – $5,800 for homeless youth services.
  • ORCCA-Share Bear Snack Pack program – $6,000 for food purchases.
  • Over the Rainbow, Inc. – $2,000 for horse feed for special needs kids program.
  • Pacific School of Dance – $1,700 for portable sound systems.
  • Pearl Buck Center, Inc. – $5,000 for nutritional meals for preschoolers.
  • Point Man Ministries Outpost 101 – $20,000 for veteran services.
  • Port Orford Arts Council – $2,000 for art supplies for elementary students.
  • Powers Food Pantry – $6,000 for food purchases.
  • Powers High School – $4,000 for school breakfast and lunch program.
  • Project Blessing Food Bank – $5,000 for food purchases.
  • Restoration Worship Center Food Pantry – $5,000 for food purchases.
  • Rogue Valley Habitat for Humanity – $5,000 for a new truck for store.
  • SBEC Senior Nutrition Program – $10,000 for home meal delivery for seniors.
  • Siuslaw Outreach Services – $5,000 for emergency assistance vouchers.
  • SMART – $2,500 for one-on-one reading support.
  • Southern Oregon Honor Flight – $5,000 for an honor flight for 10 veterans.
  • Southern Oregon Project Hope – $5,000 for homeless aid.
  • T.H.E. House – $5,000 for transportation costs and kitchen upgrades.
  • Women’s Safety and Resource Center – $3,000 for a Coddington Place advocate.
  • Zonta Service Foundation – $3,500 for school supplies.

Each year the Coquille Indian Tribe has set aside a portion of the gaming revenues from The Mill Casino to support projects in the Tribe’s five-county service area. Since its inception in 2001, the Fund has distributed more than $4.3 million to support charitable efforts throughout the region.

Grants authorized by the Fund’s Board of Trustees provided over $125,000 to programs providing food and other assistance to individuals and families in need as well as programs targeted specifically to children.

“As has been true in most years, the requests for funding far outstripped our resources,” said Sheldon Chase, Board of Trustees chairman. “We were able to provide grants to a wide variety of programs, but the Trustees agreed that funding programs that serve the most vulnerable members of our communities would have our highest priority.”

The Coquille Tribal Community Fund supports non-profit and governmental organizations with projects in the areas of education, health, public safety, problem gaming, environmental issues, arts and culture and historic preservation. Funds are managed and distributed by a board of trustees comprised of community leaders, a gubernatorial appointee and representatives of the Coquille Indian Tribe and the Coquille Economic Development Corporation.

The fund reflects the commitment of the Coquille Indian Tribe to take a proactive, positive role in the well-being of the community. The Tribe is among the largest employers in Coos County.

For organizations wishing to be considered for the next round of funding, the deadline for applications is Aug. 31. For more information, visit the Fund Web site at www.coquilletribalfund.org.

Study reveals economic impact of The Mill Casino and the Coquille Tribal government

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ECONorthwest, a Eugene-based economic consulting firm, recently conducted an independent study to measure the total economic impact of The Mill Casino • Hotel & RV Park and the Coquille Tribal government in 2010 (the most recent data available).

The study revealed that over 1,300 local jobs and over $125 million in economic output in 2010 can be directly or indirectly traced to business and governmental activity of the Coquille Indian Tribe.

According to the post, ECONorthwest Estimates the Economic Impact of the Coquille Indian Tribe and Mill Casino, the principal measures of economic impacts used in this report are:

  • Output: the final value of all goods and services produced. For businesses, this is approximately equal to sales. For Tribal government, output equals total spending.
  • Labor Income: workers’ wages and benefits, including self-employment income.
  • Jobs: full- and part-time employment.

The report added that many of the purchases by The Mill Casino • Hotel “are for services and products that come from suppliers inside Coos County. This spending, combined with the high proportion of county residents working at The Mill, means that dollars spent by The Mill circulate further in the local economy. The ultimate impact is greater economic output, higher incomes, and more jobs in both Coos County and Oregon.”

Click here to read more in Coquille Tribe added $125M to economy in 2010


About the Coquille Indian Tribe: Comprising a people whose ancestors lived in the lands of the Coquille River watershed and lower Coos Bay, the Coquille Indian Tribe today has over 900 members and a land base of 7,043 acres. After the United States re-instituted federal recognition to the Tribe and restored its full sovereignty rights in 1989, the Coquille Tribal government created an administrative program that now provides housing, health care, education, elder care, law enforcement and judicial services to its members. The Tribe is the second largest employer in Coos County, Oregon, with successful business ventures in forestry, arts and exhibits, gaming and hospitality, assisted living and memory care, high-speed telecommunications and renewable energy.

Mill Casino Hosts Ninth Annual Salmon Celebration September 8-9, 2012

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Preparations are underway the Mill-Luck Salmon Celebration the weekend of September 8-9! The annual event features canoe races, a traditional salmon bake dinner, cultural exhibits and demonstrations, a Native American marketplace, children’s activities and two concerts with Academy Award winning songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie.

This free event is an entertaining educational experience that the whole family will enjoy. Included again this year will be a “weigh station” and awards ceremony for the 13th Annual Coos Basin Amateur Salmon Derby.

Linked to the traditional observance marking the return of the salmon, The Mill-Luck Salmon Celebration, began as a means of sharing the heritage, culture and traditions of the Coquille Indian Tribe and other Pacific Northwest Tribes with residents and visitors to Oregon’s Bay Area. Now in its ninth year, the event attracts Native American artisans and musicians from throughout the Western United States and Canada.

Known for its traditional salmon bake dinner where fresh salmon is prepared in the time-honored Coquille open-pit manner, the Mill-Luck Salmon Celebration offers visitors the opportunity to experience Native American culture, art, food and music. The celebration, which runs from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, features daily performances by Native American storytellers, drummers, flutists and dancers, a marketplace offering traditional wares and foods, a bay-front canoe exhibit and races, traditional games and activities for children, plus a variety of cultural demonstrations and educational exhibits.

In addition to the free daytime events which will take place on the casino’s waterfront dock and North Parking lot, this year’s celebration also will feature Friday and Saturday evening concerts with Oscar-winning singer and songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie, known for both her protest and love songs including Until It’s Time for You to Go, Universal Soldier, and Up Where We Belong, the theme from the 1982 movie An Officer and a Gentleman, which won her both an Academy Award Oscar and a Golden Globe.

Tickets for Sainte-Marie’s 7 p.m. Salmon Room concerts and the popular Salmon Bake dinner, which will be served from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday are on sale at Ko-Kwel Gifts inside The Mill Casino • Hotel. Tickets for the concerts are $25 per person with discounts available for Mill Club members, while tickets for the Salmon Bake dinner, including a commemorative tee shirt, are $25 for adults and just $12 for children 11 and under, with discounts available for club members.

A Look Back on Seventeen Years of the Mill Casino!

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The Mill Casino as it appeared in 1997. You can still see the plywood mill in this photo.

Can you believe it has almost 17 years since we have opened our doors?

The Mill’s Facebook page has been redesigned to fit in with Facebook’s new Timeline format. Part of that new design features some milestones in The Mill’s history. As we approach our 17th anniversary on May 15, we thought we would share those milestones here on our blog.

We really enjoyed looking back at the people and events of the last 17 years that made The Mill Casino what it is today and thought you would too. When you get a chance, take a look at our new Facebook page.

1989 Federal recognition of The Coquille Indian Tribe is restored by an act of Congress signed into law by President George H. W. Bush as Public Law 101-42 on June 28, 1989.

1992 Coquille Tribal Council creates the Coquille Economic Development Corporation to develop and manage businesses on behalf of the Coquille Tribe.

1994 The Coquille Tribe purchases the abandoned Sun Plywood Mill facility along the banks of the Coos Bay estuary.

1995 The Mill Casino opens for business on May 15, 1995.
Opening day was an adventure for everyone at The Mill – employees and guests. People throughout the region had ‘heard the buzz’ and were now gathering at the door hours before the scheduled opening. Inside, workers were still putting on the finishing touches when the decision to open the doors two hours early brought hundreds of new Mill guests into the casino for the first time. ‘There was such a crowd outside the casino that we had to open the doors early,’ said Tom Bohanan. ‘We were still laying carpet and setting slot machines when the doors opened.’

1995 First restaurant opens

1996 The Dock Fire Ask anyone who worked at The Mill during its first year about major events that have taken place and he or she eventually will start a sentence by saying, ‘Of course, there was the fire in 1996.’

On August 16, 1996 a fire began under the boardwalk to the north of The Mill and rapidly spread to areas under the casino itself. Firefighters from North Bend, Coos Bay, Charleston, Hauser and Florence joined with local and state law enforcement officers, the Coast Guard and a variety of area businesses to fight the fire and rebuild the damaged areas. Hard work by the staff and extra efforts by area businesses brought the casino back in less than 24 hours.

1997 The Mill Casino produces its first return on the Coquille Tribe’s sizeable investment. The Tribal Council used that first revenue to provide health insurance coverage for Tribal members. That effort has grown into a health insurance program that today covers Tribal members, employees of the Tribe and its businesses and their families.

1998 The original restaurant is rechristened as the Plank House.

2000 The 115-room Mill Hotel (now the Lodge) opens in June.

2001 The Coquille Tribe creates the Coquille Tribal Community Fund to share a portion of the proceeds from the casino with the community. By 2012, the Community Fund had issued $4.1 million in grants to non-profit organizations and government agencies in a five-county area.

2004 The Salmon Room opens, giving The Mill its first venue for indoor concerts, banquets and large meetings.  The Coquille Tribe purchases the 50.5-acre, former industrial land north of the casino. The property will be renamed and prepared for development as Ko-Kwel Wharf.

2005 The casino expands its table games offerings beyond Blackjack with the addition of Craps and Roulette tables.

2006 The RV Park opens, becoming the first new business on the Ko-Kwel Wharf property.  The Whitecaps lounge opens in October and leads to the demolition of the Hook Tender Saloon. These are the first steps in a major casino expansion project.

2007 A major expansion of the casino is completed in July. The project includes creation of Warehouse 101, a remodeled Timbers Café, Ko-Kwel Gifts, a larger Salmon Room and about 50% more casino space.

2008 The Hotel Tower opens in July adding 92 rooms including six suites, and executive suite, pool and hot tubs and a fitness center. Five new meeting rooms are added along with a full-service banquet kitchen.

What does the future hold?  What will we do next?  Only time will tell, but you can count on us to be here and bring you non-stop casino action, world class events and entertainment the friendliest service on the coast.

The Mill Casino today

Coquille Tribal Community Fund awards $345,800 to support regional services

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Grants awarded to 47 area non-profits for community projects

The Coquille Tribal Community Fund awarded $345,800 in grants this week to 47 area non-profit organizations and public agencies. Grants were awarded under a program established in 2001 by the Coquille Indian Tribe to set aside a portion of the gaming revenues from The Mill Casino to support projects in the Tribe’s five-county service area. Since its inception, the Fund has distributed more than $4.1 million to support charitable efforts throughout the region.

“As active members of so many communities in Southwestern Oregon, the Coquille Indian Tribe is grateful for the opportunity to help improve social conditions in our region,” said Coquille Tribal Council Chair Edward Metcalf. “With so many needs and so few resources, we are happy to do our part through the Community Fund to help our friends and neighbors during these trying times.”

Members of the Fund’s Board of Trustees paid particular attention to programs providing food to families in need. Trustees awarded $93,950 to 13 area food projects along with an additional $12,000 for two area community gardens.

“We are regularly reminded of the great need among our neighbors to meet the basic necessities of life,” said Julia Willis, Fund administrator. “Our Trustees agreed that feeding the hungry has the highest priority when considering the overall needs of our communities.”

Along with food programs, Trustees provided $31,500 for programs targeted to children and youth and $41,500 for programs in support of veterans. The Fund continued its support for the Coos County Historical Society’s Waterfront Historic and Maritime Museum with a grant of $50,000.

The Coquille Tribal Community Fund supports non-profit and governmental organizations with projects in the areas of education, health, public safety, problem gaming, environmental issues, arts and culture and historic preservation. Funds are managed and distributed by a board of trustees comprised of community leaders, a gubernatorial appointee and representatives of the Coquille Indian Tribe and the Coquille Economic Development Corporation.

The fund reflects the commitment of the Coquille Indian Tribe to take a proactive, positive role in the well-being of the community. The Tribe is among the largest employers in Coos County. For organizations wishing to be considered for the next round of funding, the deadline for applications is Aug. 31. For more information, visit the Fund Web site at www.coquilletribalfund.org.

The following organizations received grants this year.

  • Alternative Youth Activities, Inc. – $3,000 for the Mushroom Project.
  • Bandon Community Youth Center – $3,000 for after school programs.
  • Bay Area First Step – $6,000 for a community garden.
  • Bay Area Senior Activity Center – $10,000 for the senior lunch program.
  • CASA of Jackson County – $5,000 for color copier and printer.
  • Charleston Food Bank – $10,000 for food purchases.
  • Christian Help Food Bank – $3,450 for flooring replacement and food freight costs.
  • Coos Art Museum – $2,000 for the Student Biennial Exhibit.
  • Coos Bay Seventh Day Adventist Food Pantry – $10,000 for food purchases.
  • Coos County Friends of Public Health – $5,000 for exam vouchers.
  • Coos County Historical Society – $50,000 for Maritime Museum and Plaza.
  • Coos County RSVP – $4,000 for mileage reimbursement for senior volunteers.
  • Coquille Indian Tribe – $22,000 for the Talking Miluk Dictionary.
  • Crossroads Community Café – $9,000 nutritious meals.
  • Ecumenical Emergency Food Cupboard – $10,000 for food purchases.
  • Egyptian Theatre Preservation Assoc. – $3,496 for marquee sign repairs.
  • First United Methodist Church – $3,500 for food purchases.
  • Florence Food Share – $9,000 for food purchases and Share Garden support.
  • Florence Habitat for Humanity – $4,000 for interior and finishing supplies.
  • Huerto de la Familia – $6,000 for community gardens.
  • Junction City/Harrisburg/Monroe Habitat for Humanity – $4,000 for the Bilingual Build Project.
  • Maslow Project – $4,500 for homeless youth services.
  • Mobility Unlimited – $2,500 for the Mobility to Employment Program.
  • Nancy Devereux Center – $6,000 for building improvements.
  • ORCO Arts – $5,000 for the Youth Leadership Program.
  • Oregon Coast Community Action-CASA – $5,000 for volunteer recruitment and training.
  • Oregon Coast Community Action Emergency Housing Program – $5,000 for short-term emergency housing.
  • ORCCA-Share Bear Snack Pack program – $2,000 for food purchases.
  • Oregon Community Foundation – $3,000 for the Ready to Smile dental program.
  • Over the Rainbow, Inc. – $2,000 for horse feed.
  • Parent Partnership – $5,000 for homeless youth services.
  • Point Man Ministries Outpost 101 – $15,000 for veteran assistance.
  • Powers Action Team/Television Translator – $5,000 to re-establish “off air” television to the Powers-Gaylord area.
  • Powers Food Pantry – $6,000 for food purchases.
  • Project Blessing Food Bank – $5,000 for food purchases.
  • Restoration Worship Center Food Pantry – $6,000 for food purchases.
  • Rogue Valley Habitat for Humanity – $4,000 for the Women’s Build project.
  • SHAMA-Mental Health Association of SW Oregon – $6,000 for the Peer Support Learning Center.
  • SMART – $3,000 for book purchases.
  • South Coast Business Employment Corp. – $10,000 for home delivered meals for seniors.
  • South Coast Veterans Assistance Network – $10,000 for the Veterans Stand Down event.
  • Southwestern Veterans Outreach – $12,500 for office support.
  • St. Paul’s Preschool – $3,000 for preschool program support.
  • Sutherlin Community Resource Center – $3,000 for after school programs.
  • T.H.E. House – $15,854 for a new commercial dishwasher, air circulation system, security lighting and food purchases.
  • VFW Post 3440 – $4,000 for a roof replacement.
  • Women’s Safety and Resource Center – $15,000 for a senior advocate position.

Mill Casino Hosts Eighth Annual Salmon Celebration September 10-11

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Preparations are underway for the Eighth annual Mill-Luck Salmon Celebration, which will take place on Saturday and Sunday, September 10-11, at The Mill Casino Hotel & RV Park on the shores of Coos Bay.

The free weekend event – featuring canoe races, cultural exhibits and demonstrations, children’s activities and a Native American marketplace – promises to be an entertaining and educational experience for the whole family. Also, tickets may be purchased for a traditional salmon bake dinner or an evening with the Pow Wow Comedy Jam.

New this year, the Celebration will include a “weigh station” for the 12th Annual Coos Basin Amateur Salmon Derby taking place the same weekend.

Linked to traditional observances marking the return of the salmon, The Mill-Luck Salmon Celebration, began as a means of sharing the heritage, culture and traditions of the Coquille Indian Tribe and other Pacific Northwest Tribes with residents and visitors to Oregon’s Bay Area. Now in its eighth year, the event attracts Native American artisans and musicians from throughout the Western United States and Canada.

Known for showcasing a traditional salmon bake dinner where fresh salmon is prepared in the time-honored Coquille open-pit manner, the Mill-Luck Salmon Celebration offers visitors the opportunity to experience Native American culture, art, food and music. The celebration, which runs from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, features daily performances by Native American storytellers, drummers, flutists and dancers, a marketplace offering traditional wares and foods, a bay-front canoe exhibit and races, traditional games and activities for children, plus a variety of cultural demonstrations and educational exhibits.

In addition to the free daytime events which will take place on the casino’s waterfront dock and South end of the Hotel, this year’s celebration will also feature the nation’s premiere Native American comedy troupe, Paw Wow Comedy Jam, which was recently awarded the North American Indigenous Image Award for Comedy Performance. Recognized by their peers and fans for their ground-breaking comedy, Paw Wow Comedy Jam showcases three of the best and brightest Native American comedians: Vaughn Eaglebear, Marc Yaffee and Gilbert Brown. They will perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the Salmon Room.

Tickets for the Pow Wow Comedy Jam and the popular Salmon Bake dinner, which will be served from 11a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, will go on sale at Ko-Kwel Gifts inside The Mill Casino • Hotel on Tuesday, June 7 at 10 a.m. Tickets for the concert are $18 per person with an $8 discount for Millionaire$ Club members, while tickets for the Salmon Bake dinner, including a commemorative tee shirt, are just $17 for children 12 and under and $25 for adults with a $5 discount for club members. Call 800.953.4800 for more info!

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